Software updates  •  21.04.2021

Ported Jevero to Rhino7

Ported Jevero to Rhino7
Published on 21.04.2021

Today, Great Place to Work and Fortune Magazine have honored Adobe as one of the 100 Best Companies to Work For. We are so proud to say that this is Adobe’s 21st year on the prestigious list, and have come in at no. 18, moving up 17 spots from last year.

Today, Great Place to Work and Fortune Magazine have honored Adobe as one of the 100 Best Companies to Work For. We are so proud to say that this is Adobe’s 21st year on the prestigious list, and have come in at no. 18, moving up 17 spots from last year.

To determine the 2021 list, Great Place to Work surveyed over half a million employees on issues including how trustworthy, caring and fair the company is in times of crises; employees’ physical, emotional and financial health; and the company’s broader community impact. Particular attention was paid to how employees’ experiences varied depending on their job role, gender, race/ethnicity, payroll status, and other characteristics to ensure that the company is creating a great workplace for all.

After 21 years of being recognized, especially after a tumultuous 2020, here are our lessons learned.

1. Our people are our most important asset

Adobe’s success is not possible without our 22,000+ employees around the globe, who are rallied around our mission and strategy – to create products and experiences that inspire people, transform industries, and move the world forward. Simply put, our people come first, and our top priority remains the health and wellbeing of our employees. So, how do we make sure our people are taken care of? From life changing benefits to robust developmental opportunities, we enable all our employees to succeed at work and at home, and achieve their goals.

Ho chi minh statue city hall saigon
Ho chi minh statue city hall saigon

2. Culture changes. Values do not

As a company that’s been around for over 35 years and is constantly growing, we recognize that our company culture is fluid. However, what has not changed are our company’s core values. When John Warnock and Chuck Geschke founded Adobe in 1982, they wanted to build a company that was technologically innovative and prosperous. But they also wanted to create a workplace based on honesty, trust and a belief in treating others as they would like to be treated. Adobe’s core values—Genuine, Exceptional, Innovative and Involved—remain critical to our success, guide how we hire candidates, and are embodied by our employees worldwide.

3. Putting time on Earth in the palm of our hand

Making a planet-sized timelapse video required a significant amount of what we call “pixel crunching” in Earth Engine, Google’s cloud platform for geospatial analysis. To add animated Timelapse imagery to Google Earth, we gathered more than 24 million satellite images from 1984 to 2020, representing quadrillions of pixels. It took more than two million processing hours across thousands of machines in Google Cloud to compile 20 petabytes of satellite imagery into a single 4.4 terapixel-sized video mosaic — that’s the equivalent of 530,000 videos in 4K resolution! And all this computing was done inside our carbon-neutral, 100% renewable energy-matched data centers, which are part of our commitments to help build a carbon-free future.

As far as we know, Timelapse in Google Earth is the largest video on the planet, of our planet. And creating it required out-of-this-world collaboration. This work was possible because of the U.S. government and European Union’s commitments to open and accessible data. Not to mention their herculean efforts to launch rockets, rovers, satellites and astronauts into space in the spirit of knowledge and exploration. Timelapse in Google Earth simply wouldn’t have been possible without NASA and the United States Geological Survey’s Landsat program, the world’s first (and longest-running) civilian Earth observation program, and the European Union’s Copernicus program with its Sentinel satellites.